How to color eggs with onion shells.

wewantwow:

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This must be the most beautiful DIY tutorial I have ever seen. And it so happens to be in style of this weekend. Found on Ulicam, a very nice blog by Ulrika Kestere, photographer and illustrator. For the whole tutorial and lot’s of inspiration, click here.

  • tagged as:
#HEIDI 
I would cover them in dandelions or flowering clover and it would be glorious.

Be sure to release them into your neighbors yards so they can spread the glory!

  • tagged as:
#replies #khanzilla 
Also a bit of a Sparradile design update, pretty-much just to make her less cartoony. I don’t really care if she’s drawn with the old version, since really this was the original and then I simplified it because in 7th grade I couldn’t draw this very quickly. But now I can so it’s how I’ll be drawing her. P: 

Also a bit of a Sparradile design update, pretty-much just to make her less cartoony. I don’t really care if she’s drawn with the old version, since really this was the original and then I simplified it because in 7th grade I couldn’t draw this very quickly. But now I can so it’s how I’ll be drawing her. P: 

  • tagged as:
#the Sparradile #sketches 
There is a variety of mobile tubers on the Sparradile-verse that have formed a symbiotic relationship with pretty-much any flower that can seed them. It is believed that originally their mobility evolved to collect seeds to seed the tubers but the flowers take advantage of it to now to add to pollination opportunities. These tubers only move when their flower is in bloom (they seem to be stimulated by cytokinins and gibberellins from their companion flower). Their mobility is driven by hydraulic pressure (as far as it is understood, anyway) and during their flowering period they need massive amounts of water. If they don’t have enough water, they don’t move. The tubers reproduce by growing eyes rather than a flower and seeds.
These tubers grow no leaves of their own and instead rely on their companion flower to photosynthesize and share sugars. The tuber provides water and nutrients through the roots (the companion flower grows roots into the tuber itself and draws nutrients straight out of it). 
The tubers are edible (excepting that they have been known to pick up toxic properties if paired with a poisonous plant) and used for food, but their primary use is aesthetic. They’re fun to watch waddle around when they’re flowering and are therefore more exciting than your basic potted plant. :P Some folk (with enough water around) even seem to enjoy seeding enough tubers with grasses to create a lawn out of them and then having their lawn get up and rearrange itself every summer. For some reason. They are plants through and through and although some do keep them as “pets”, they develop no affection for their keeper (nor do they interact with them at all, they just wander blindly until their flower goes to seed). They are sturdy enough to be walked on (although their companion plant may not be). 
Only relatively small flowers can be grown on these, and only if they grow from a seed (no bulbs). Trees and bushes are out of the question, but besides that, there can be a lot of variety in how the tubers are used. How long the tubers live depend largely on their companion flower, but perennial plants have not been known to keep a single tuber alive for more than a few years. 

There is a variety of mobile tubers on the Sparradile-verse that have formed a symbiotic relationship with pretty-much any flower that can seed them. It is believed that originally their mobility evolved to collect seeds to seed the tubers but the flowers take advantage of it to now to add to pollination opportunities. These tubers only move when their flower is in bloom (they seem to be stimulated by cytokinins and gibberellins from their companion flower). Their mobility is driven by hydraulic pressure (as far as it is understood, anyway) and during their flowering period they need massive amounts of water. If they don’t have enough water, they don’t move. The tubers reproduce by growing eyes rather than a flower and seeds.

These tubers grow no leaves of their own and instead rely on their companion flower to photosynthesize and share sugars. The tuber provides water and nutrients through the roots (the companion flower grows roots into the tuber itself and draws nutrients straight out of it). 

The tubers are edible (excepting that they have been known to pick up toxic properties if paired with a poisonous plant) and used for food, but their primary use is aesthetic. They’re fun to watch waddle around when they’re flowering and are therefore more exciting than your basic potted plant. :P Some folk (with enough water around) even seem to enjoy seeding enough tubers with grasses to create a lawn out of them and then having their lawn get up and rearrange itself every summer. For some reason. They are plants through and through and although some do keep them as “pets”, they develop no affection for their keeper (nor do they interact with them at all, they just wander blindly until their flower goes to seed). They are sturdy enough to be walked on (although their companion plant may not be). 

Only relatively small flowers can be grown on these, and only if they grow from a seed (no bulbs). Trees and bushes are out of the question, but besides that, there can be a lot of variety in how the tubers are used. How long the tubers live depend largely on their companion flower, but perennial plants have not been known to keep a single tuber alive for more than a few years. 

Track: I Feel Pretty
Arist: Santino Fontana
599,193 plays

jellicent:

"For his audition for Prince Hans (from Frozen) he sang a cover of "I Feel Pretty" from the musical West Side Story, though had altered lyrics, turning the song into a self-centerednarcisistic, yet funny chant.” [x]

THEY SHOULD HAVE PUT THIS IN THE MOVIE AS HIS VILLAIN SONG, OMG HANS.

  • tagged as:
#Heidi 
avianawareness:

(via 500px / New Zealand Kea by Ed Janwattana)

avianawareness:

(via 500px / New Zealand Kea by Ed Janwattana)

  • tagged as:
#love those colors! 
quiet-nymph:

Photography by Cissa Rego

quiet-nymph:

Photography by Cissa Rego

  • tagged as:
#reference 
fairy-wren:

(via 500px / Löffler by Georg Scharf)

fairy-wren:

(via 500px / Löffler by Georg Scharf)

  • tagged as:
#neat #reference 

awkwardsituationist:

crypsis is the ability of an organism to blend in with its environment, as seen here in (click pic) grasshoppers, mantids, geckos (three in the fifth photo), toads (three in the ninth photo), snakes and katydids, all of which have evolved to mimic or become inconspicuous amongst leaves. photos by (click pic) john cancalosi, christian zeigler, mattias klum and thomas marent.

"…from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved." - charles darwin

  • tagged as:
#cuties